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Welcome to my blog. It contains new and archived messages that I have sent to the campus. Feel free to browse!

Matthew A. Tarr PhD
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This is the list of all contributions published on this web site, in chronological order.

The New Frontiers in Astronomy and Cosmology International Grant Competition is offering opportunities for innovative research on the following topics: (I) What was the earliest state of the universe? (II) Is our universe unique or is it part of a much larger multiverse? (III) What is the origin of the complexity in the universe? (IV) Are we alone in the universe? Or, are there other life and intelligence beyond the solar system? Grants are offered for theoretical work, up to $300,000 for two years; and experimental research, up to $500,000 for two years. REQUIRED ONLINE PRE-APPLICATION FORM IS DUE APRIL 16, NOW AVAILABLE ON AT http://www.newfrontiersinastronomy.org/research-grant-program.html See www.newfrontiersinastronomy.org for more details.
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 4/9/2012 @ 12:46:16, in Vice President Ramblings, read 574 times)
UNO Researchers again met the GRAD Act metrics. Federal research in the categories defined within the GRAD Act increased from $10.6M to $10.7M (five-year rolling average) and total research increased from $17.4M to $17.7M even though the number of research/instructional faculty (FTE) dropped from 418 to 368. The percent of faculty that are either PIs or Co-PIs on grants rose from 26.3% to 28.0% during the past year.
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 4/4/2012 @ 12:52:33, in Vice President Ramblings, read 630 times)
The University of New Orleans has achieved a milestone in titanium shipbuilding research at its National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM), located at the NASA Michoud Facility in New Orleans East. Engineers are pioneering a technique called friction stir welding, in which metal pieces are welded together without melting them, causing less damage to the materials. The longest of the welds is more than 16 feet, which is more than twice as long as the previous record for a continuous titanium friction stir weld. The titanium shipbuilding project is being financed by a three-year $4.8 million dollar grant from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the research is to advance the science and technology of titanium shipbuilding. Using a special robotic welding tool at NCAM, engineers produced a completed titanium panel, approximately 20-feet by 10-feet. The panel will be part of an experimental, full-scale titanium mid-ship section. Titanium alloys offer advantages over steels and aluminum alloys traditionally used in shipbuilding. They are more resistant to corrosion, have a high strength-to-weight ratio and have a high resistance to fatigue. Pingsha Dong, a professor in UNO’s School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and director of UNO’s Welded Structures Laboratory, says that despite these advantages, the cost of materials and the lack of robust welding and joining techniques have prevented the shipbuilding industry from realizing the potential of titanium for shipbuilding applications. The progress of UNO’s titanium shipbuilding project has earned considerable attention in the maritime media including Maritime Reporter & Engineering News and Seapower magazine.
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 4/4/2012 @ 11:53:52, in Vice President Ramblings, read 571 times)
April’s topic for NASA’s Year of the Solar System (YSS) – Ice! Join us in April as we explore ice and its properties, locations, and what it tells us about the solar system. This month, we will also celebrate Earth Day on April 22!
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 4/3/2012 @ 10:12:47, in Funding Opportunities, read 630 times)
NSF has released the solicitation for funding under the President's "Big Data" initiative. "The Core Techniques and Technologies for Advancing Big Data Science & Engineering (BIGDATA) solicitation aims to advance the core scientific and technological means of managing, analyzing, visualizing, and extracting useful information from large, diverse, distributed and heterogeneous data sets so as to: accelerate the progress of scientific discovery and innovation; lead to new fields of inquiry that would not otherwise be possible; encourage the development of new data analytic tools and algorithms; facilitate scalable, accessible, and sustainable data infrastructure; increase understanding of human and social processes and interactions; and promote economic growth and improved health and quality of life." Full Proposal Deadline Date: June 13, 2012 for Mid-Scale Projects and Full Proposal Deadline Date: July 11, 2012 for Small Projects. Details of solicitation are here: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504767
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 3/27/2012 @ 11:03:49, in Workshops, read 667 times)
On behalf of ABSciex and Phenomenex, Quasar Instruments would like to invite you to the MASS-tastic Voyage! This tour features a full demonstration laboratory that highlights food testing using general mass spectrometry and chromatography techniques. Come out to the LC/MS/MS lab-on-wheels for live sample analysis and to learn more about how this advanced separation and detection technology can save you time and money while providing more accurate results. Join us: March 28, 2012 University of New Orleans, Human Performance Center Corner of Leon C. Simon and Elysian Fields 10:30 am – 4:00 pm For more information, please follow the links at our website: http://www.quasarinstruments.com/t-demolab.aspx
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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 3/21/2012 @ 09:47:54, in Workshops, read 604 times)
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 THURSDAY, MARCH 22 KH 122 CSB 109 12:30 – 1:30 12:30 – 1:30 Join the staff of the Graduate School and the Office of Research to learn: • WHERE TO FIND FUNDING TO SUPPORT YOUR RESEARCH • WHAT TO CONSIDER BEFORE APPLYING FOR A GRANT OR FELLOWSHIP • BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING FOR EXTERNAL FUNDING A LIGHT LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED RSVP: GRADSCHOOL@UNO.EDU
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On Monday March 26th, at 10:30 in GP 2025 we are conducting a one hour ethics discussion session led by Dr. Robert Laird from the Psychology Department. This training is required as part of UNO’s Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training. RCR training is required for all individuals (faculty, staff and students) who receive a salary or a stipend from the National Science Foundation or U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (which includes the National Institutes of Health); the funds can either be directly from these entities or indirectly through a state or private entity.

If you have already attended one of these sessions or watched the DVD “The Lab,” you do not need to attend but you are welcome to attend if you desire. Space is limited so you must register. If you have students working with you that must complete the RCR training, make sure they are aware of this requirement. If you anticipate receiving funds, please attend. The session is open to everyone even if you do not receive funds from the entities listed above.

To register, please follow this link: Professional Development Registrations. (Navigation in SharePoint is: Research, Professional Development, Professional Development Registrations.)

You will need to add a new item – click New on the menu bar and then New Item. Fill in the requested information and click OK. You will receive an email stating that your registration is in process. Once approved or rejected (if the session is full) you will receive another email.

If you have any questions, please contact Carol Mitton at extension 5546 or cmitton@uno.edu.

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By Carol Lunn (on 3/21/2012 @ 09:12:35, in Important, read 701 times)

Fringe Benefits are calculated on all regular employees of the University, including postdoctoral research associates and intermittent employees. Benefits are not calculated on graduate assistants or student workers. The fringe benefit rate is never negotiable.

The fringe benefit rate is projected to be 39% effective July 1, 2012. Please begin to use 39% for full time employees on all proposal budgets and continue to use 8.2% for intermittent wage employees. You should continue to include a 1% fringe increase in your annual budgets for future fiscal years. We recommend you use a 40% fringe benefit rate for fiscal year 2013-2014 and beyond.

This is the rate to use until a new fringe benefit rate is negotiated. We will send the approved rate agreement and post on the ORSP Proposal Development website when Financial Services receives it from the Department of Health and Human Services.

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By Dr. Whittenburg (on 3/20/2012 @ 14:23:43, in Vice President Ramblings, read 738 times)
The latest issue of Maritime Reporter features an article on our Ti Ship Structure Workshop at UNO. The story is on page 58 of the print version, and page 60 of the online version. Examining the Business Case for a Titanium Ship By Edward Lundquist Maritime Reporter March 2012 http://www.digitalwavepublishing.com/pubs/nwm/maritimereporter/201203/
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